Lasst Uns Erfreuen

Five-verse arrangement of the hymn Light's glittering morn, translated by John Mason Neale from the 9th C. office hymn, Aurora lucis rutilat ("Dawn's light glitters") as found in the 2013 edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern.

The tune was the setting for the Easter hymn, Lasst uns erfreuen herzlich sehr, an anonymous tune from first appeared in the Jesuit hymnal Ausserlesene Catholische Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne, 1623, ed. Friedrich Spee)

  • Organ score 8 ½ x 14 (Landscape)
  • Instrumental parts 8 ½ x 11
  • Choral Part 8 ½ x 11

$35.00


The hymn Light's glittering morn is translated from 9th C. office hymn, Aurora lucis rutilat ("Dawn's light glitters") found in the Frankish Murbacher Hymnen. The texts are in Latin with translations in Old High German formatted as interlinear glosses. The original 11 verses plus doxology have since been separated in the Roman Breviary into three separate hymns for use at Lauds, which is sung at daybreak; the current version is from John Mason Neale's translation, as found in the 2013 edition of Hymns Ancient and Modern, which compresses the original versification into a single, five-verse hymn.

The tune was the setting for the Easter hymn, Lasst uns erfreuen herzlich sehr, which celebrates the resurrection narrative from the perspective of Mary. The anonymous tune from first appeared in the Jesuit hymnal Ausserlesene Catholische Geistliche Kirchengesänge (Cologne, 1623, ed. Friedrich Spee), derived at least in part from earlier sources (the opening phrase appeared a century earlier in Strassburger Kirchenampt, 1525, which evolved into the Genevan Psalter). The Cologne setting quickly produced variants regarding the distribution of the alleluiasA thoroughly-researched discussion of the tune's evolution into modern 6/4 format can be found on the Hymn Society of Great Britain and Ireland website.

First publication